FLEET READINESS CENTER EAST

~ Service to the Fleet ~

Since 1943, Fleet Readiness Center East aboard Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina, has played an important part in national defense.  Our workforce has earned a reputation of excellence in providing world-class maintenance, engineering and logistics support for Navy and Marine Corps aviation, as well as other armed services, federal agencies and foreign governments. Our skilled workforce uses state-of-the-art technology to ensure that FRCE is without equal in providing quality, cost-effective support. Our employees take great pride in their work, and this professional spirit is evident in the high-quality products they produce.

Our mission is to maintain and operate facilities for and perform a complete range of depot level rework operations on designated weapon systems, accessories, and equipment; manufacture parts and assemblies as required; provide engineering services in the development of changes of hardware design; furnish technical services on aircraft maintenance and logistic problems; and perform, upon specific request or assignment, other levels of aircraft maintenance.

FLEET READINESS CENTER EAST

~ Service to the Fleet ~

Since 1943, Fleet Readiness Center East aboard Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina, has played an important part in national defense.  Our workforce has earned a reputation of excellence in providing world-class maintenance, engineering and logistics support for Navy and Marine Corps aviation, as well as other armed services, federal agencies and foreign governments. Our skilled workforce uses state-of-the-art technology to ensure that FRCE is without equal in providing quality, cost-effective support. Our employees take great pride in their work, and this professional spirit is evident in the high-quality products they produce.

Our mission is to maintain and operate facilities for and perform a complete range of depot level rework operations on designated weapon systems, accessories, and equipment; manufacture parts and assemblies as required; provide engineering services in the development of changes of hardware design; furnish technical services on aircraft maintenance and logistic problems; and perform, upon specific request or assignment, other levels of aircraft maintenance.

FRC East News View More

May 10, 2024

Imaginations soar at Air Show STEM Day

A new event promoting science, technology, engineering and mathematics education took flight Friday as part of the Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Cherry Point Air Show festivities.

Approximately 1,000 Craven County sixth graders attended the MCAS Cherry Point Air Show STEM Day, organized by the Fleet Readiness Center East (FRCE) STEM Outreach Team in support of MCAS Cherry Point and Marine Corps Community Services Cherry Point. Students had the opportunity to interact with members of the Blue Angels maintenance team and visit more than 30 interactive stations featuring activities including constructing wooden planes and foam gliders, digging for fossils, and demonstrating robots and drones. Ongoing practice sessions by air show performers, and aircraft and military vehicle displays added to the “wow” factor.

The 2024 MCAS Cherry Point Air Show STEM Day marks the first of what organizers hope will become a recurring event alongside the air show. It was a natural fit with the team’s mission of engaging, inspiring and educating students from eastern North Carolina while highlighting the wide range of career opportunities available at the depot, said FRCE STEM Outreach Team Lead Randall Lewis. 

“Having a STEM education event connected to the air show provided such great energy, because the kids are already so pumped about all things aviation-related at this point – the timing couldn’t be more perfect,” he said. “This event was a huge success in terms of turnout and student engagement, and our team is hopeful that STEM Day will become a regular part of the air show schedule. We don’t get many better opportunities to reach out to this number of local students all at once.

“We’ll take any opportunity we can to get kids excited about STEM, and I’m optimistic that every one of these students left here today with newfound knowledge that the possibilities for STEM-related careers are nearly endless,” Lewis continued. “STEM Day allowed us to introduce them to the wide range of STEM-related careers both at FRC East and beyond. In just one day, these children were able to see how STEM skills can apply to career fields ranging from aviation to robotics to healthcare, and even archaeology and marine biology. Today’s activities really drove home the idea that STEM is for everyone.”

Planning for STEM Day began earlier this year, when MCAS Cherry Point leadership approached FRCE about the possibility of collaborating for the event. FRCE Commanding Officer Capt. James M. Belmont said there was never any doubt in his mind that expanding the continued partnership between FRCE and Cherry Point would benefit both commands and the community.

“Taking part in the Air Show STEM Day is really a win-win-win for everybody involved,” Belmont said. “This event allowed us to help inspire local students to consider future careers in STEM fields. We were able to be good neighbors and provide support to Cherry Point and their amazing Air Show. And best of all, nearly 1,000 kids got to take part in some really cool activities and unique experiences that they might not otherwise have a chance to.

“It gives me great confidence we’re building tomorrow’s workforce today, right here in eastern North Carolina,” Belmont continued. “Many of these students will one day be supporting our nation’s warfighters through work at FRC East and Cherry Point.”

MCAS Cherry Point Commanding Officer Col. Brendan Burks agreed there is a need to prepare future STEM professionals for careers in the eastern North Carolina region.

“With the current and future advanced aviation technologies and jobs coming to MCAS Cherry Point and advancements in our local communities, it is important that we build the opportunities and interests in STEM to support and develop our current and future job forces and leaders in the area, both civilian and military, to meet the future demands and challenges,” he said.

Activities like the Air Show STEM Day are part of cross-organizational, multi-faceted plan to increase STEM exposure for area students, Burks noted.

“This layered approach with the community is one of the bids for success to ensure this area can develop and hire the future job force needed to support the growth and expansion of not only the MCAS Cherry Point mission, but also the local communities,” he said. “This is a team sport, so we all have to work together to achieve success.”

Tina Vande Slunt, a sixth-grade teacher at Tucker Creek Middle School, said she was impressed by the variety and quality of the activities offered during the event. She said more events like the Air Show STEM Day are important to help prepare students for the future.

“I’m really excited about opportunities like this because we need more STEM,” she said. “These kids who are here today are going to be the ones who are going to go to the moon, they’re going to be colonizing Mars – they’re going to be our future astronauts, engineers and scientists. If they don’t understand what opportunities are out there for them for careers, we’re going to have a shortage of individuals with those skills.

“It’s really important for them to be here today,” Vande Slunt continued. “And they seem so excited about all the different activities, and we can use this to our advantage. I know I’m going back into the classroom to ask the students what they liked and what they didn’t, and use that information to help them investigate different career choices.”

In the end, the most important outcomes from events like the Air Show STEM Day are hard to measure, Belmont said – but they are apparent.

“We now have teammates working at FRC East who attended STEM-based summer camps supported by the command when outreach efforts first got started almost 20 years ago,” he said. “We now have families in eastern North Carolina who know they can make a good life right here at home in technical careers, and they never have to leave the area if they don’t want to; that applies to our skilled trades and engineering jobs, along with other career paths available at the depot. Outreach efforts like the Air Show STEM Day allow us to increase quality of life for our local communities and support our warfighters, and that really is the best possible result of these efforts.”

FRCE is North Carolina's largest maintenance, repair, overhaul and technical services provider, with more than 4,000 civilian, military and contract workers. Its annual revenue exceeds $1 billion. The depot provides service to the fleet while functioning as an integral part of the greater U.S. Navy; Naval Air Systems Command; and Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers.

May 6, 2024

FRCE earns seventh CNO Aviation Safety Award

Fleet Readiness Center East (FRCE) received recognition for exceptional attention to safety when the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) announced the winners of the fiscal year 2023 CNO Aviation Safety Awards March 24.

FRCE earned the award, also known as the Navy’s Safety “S,” for demonstrating sustained safety excellence. Of more than 200 active U.S. Navy and Marine Corps aviation units operating under the Navy chain of command, FRCE became one of just 53 organizations selected for the honor, and one of only two within Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR). Selection criteria for the award include aviation mishap rates, flight exposure, operational risk management readiness and the overall strength of the command’s safety management system.

“Earning the CNO Aviation Safety Award is a testament to the robust safety culture at FRC East, and a demonstration of the safety concepts and practices that are second nature throughout the command,” said FRCE Commanding Officer Capt. James M. Belmont. “Our focus remains on the Marines and Sailors supported by every aircraft we touch. The FRC East workforce understands the risks our service members take when performing their duties, and we take very seriously our responsibility to ensure we don’t transfer any risk from the depot to our nation’s warfighters.

“While we don’t have our own aircraft on which we can proudly display the Safety S, our Fleet customers have come to understand that the FRC East name is synonymous with safety and quality,” Belmont continued. “Earning the CNO Aviation Safety Award just reinforces that reputation.”

This marks the seventh time FRCE has received the award, with previous wins in 1984, 1991, 1996, 2004, 2010 and 2013.

Marine Capt. Andrew Neuman, the H-53E Military Branch Head at FRCE who serves as the command’s aviation safety officer, said he feels the command’s robust safety management system weighed heavily in the Naval Safety Command’s decision to award the honor to the depot.

“I’d say the policies and procedures we have in place here definitely make a difference,” Neuman said. “People here are already doing things the right way the, and the overall safety culture of the command permeates everything we do. The Navy tell us how to be safe, or how to report mishaps, or be proactive in preventing mishaps – it’s all in writing already. But unless you choose to actually read, comprehend and implement what the Navy is saying, it’s not going to help. I think the comprehension and implementation are something we do particularly well here, and the safety culture is very alive and strong as a result of that.”

In fiscal year 2023, FRCE logged 230 mishap-free flight hours in five types of aircraft for the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force: the F-35B Lightning II, MV-22B Osprey, MH-53E Sea Stallion and CH-53E Super Stallion, and UH-1N Huey. The team of five military pilots, one civilian pilot and three enlisted military aircrew accomplished this feat over 192 flights, including functional check flights that test aircraft systems and performance, and ferry deliveries of aircraft as they return to their home squadrons.

Neuman said the number of hours flown at FRCE may seem minuscule in comparison to operational squadrons, but the depot has posted 26 years of flight without a Class A mishap, and 45 years of operation since the last Class B or C mishap. He attributes this success to the care and attention of the depot’s workforce.

“Safe flight operations are preceded by proper maintenance being conducted. We may only have a total of nine pilots and aircrew at FRC East, but really, there are more than 4,200 people contributing to this process,” Neuman explained. “It comes back to the fact that we really care if there’s a problem that’s identified, and we do everything we can to mitigate any issues. It takes a proactive approach to safety to try to stop problems before they occur.”

FRCE dedicated almost 670,000 labor hours to aircraft maintenance in fiscal year 2023, returning to the Fleet 62 aircraft, 67 engines and 11,435 components. Neuman said the workforce’s attention to detail and adherence to safety and quality instructions enable this level of safe, successful performance.

“There is inherent risk to aviation safety, but being very methodical, following the checklists and doing everything step by step and in order allows us to complete maintenance evolutions in the safest manner possible,” he added. “We really are delivering a fantastic product back to the Fleet.”

Results like these stem from proactive leadership, education, and dedication to incremental improvements in every area and level of the command, said Compliance and Quality Department Head Amy Morgan, who provides oversight to the team staffing the depot’s Safety and Occupational Health Division.

“Instilling a sense of ownership through education is a critical contribution to FRC East’s proactive safety campaign,” she said. “Persistent leadership follow-up after aviation safety stand downs ensures that the command’s civilian workforce and Marines remain committed to the safety posture, risk management and crew resource management practices, and current trends in safety. Those lessons are integrated into daily routines.”

When safety-related best practices become second nature for everyone within the command, it can only improve outcomes for both FRCE and the nation’s warfighters, Morgan explained.

“By actively seeking to improve our safety culture and expand our high standards of quality, FRC East will continue to lead the Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers enterprise in safety achievements,” she added.

FRC East has a history of promoting safety as a key tenet of the command’s values, which is now yielding impressive results. Recently, FRCE was selected as the winner of the Chief of Naval Operations Shore Safety Award in the Large Industrial category for fiscal year 2023. FRCE’s exemplary safety record has also been recognized by the North Carolina Department of Labor Safety Awards Program, which recently awarded the depot its seventh consecutive Gold Award and four Million Hour safety awards. The Million Hour safety awards are given to employers each time they accumulate 1 million employee hours with no injuries or illnesses involving days away from work. To meet the Gold Award standard, an organization must meet the criteria for a safety award and achieve a DART rate at least 50 percent below the industry average.

Additionally, FRCE recently earned recertification as a Star Site in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) for two of the depot’s nine application areas in early 2023. Star Site status is the highest level of recognition in the VPP program and is awarded only to employers who demonstrate exemplary achievement in the prevention and control of occupational safety and health hazards. FRCE first achieved OSHA VPP Star Site status in 2019 in two of the depot’s application areas, becoming the first naval aviation command to reach that level. With that accomplishment, FRCE is the only NAVAIR command to achieve Star Site certification, and one of just 20 Navy sites and 62 Department of Defense facilities worldwide to earn the recognition.

Apr 22, 2024

FRCE receives the 2024 SECNAV Environmental Award

The Office of the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) recently recognized Fleet Readiness Center East (FRCE) for its continued commitment to environmental stewardship, awarding the command the 2024 Secretary of the Navy Environmental Award for Sustainability in the Industrial Installation category.

SECNAV Environmental Awards recognize installations, teams and individuals for their accomplishments in innovative and cost-effective environmental management strategies supporting mission readiness.

This is the fifth time FRCE has received a SECNAV Environmental Award. According to FRCE Commanding Officer Capt. James M. Belmont, this continued recognition highlights the role of the depot’s workforce in maintaining FRCE’s successful environmental record.

“Being a good steward of the environment is important to us at FRC East,” said Belmont. “We don’t just work in the community, we live here and are a part of it. Every member of the FRC East team is committed to maintaining environmental quality and compliance while delivering capable and quality aircraft to the Fleet.”

Andrew Krelie, director of the Environmental Division at FRCE, said the depot has been achieving or exceeding its annual environmental goals for many years now. He attributed the depot’s win to workforce engagement and active participation.

“This is a depot-wide effort,” said Krelie. “This is not an Environmental Division award, it is an FRC East award. The whole facility earned this and deserves credit for increasing our recycling rates, reducing our energy consumption and reducing industrial waste water generation. These are the three large goals that we have had for over a decade now, and continue to improve on those due to the efforts and commitment of our workforce.”

FRCE aims to divert 62 percent of its solid waste by 2025, far exceeding the requirements established by Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers. In fiscal year 2023, the depot maintained an average landfill diversion rate of 61 percent.

The depot has also set out to reduce industrial wastewater generation 36 percent by 2025. In fiscal year 2022, the calculated goal was 92.6 million gallons. FRCE reduced influent flow rates to less than half that with 56.5 million gallons eliminated.

FRCE’s goal for energy conservation is to reduce energy consumption 25 percent by 2025. The depot is installing green fixtures and coordinating with Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Cherry Point, Headquarters Marine Corps, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, and Duke Energy to identify aging infrastructure, propose measures to eliminate redundant electrical systems and establish significant energy conservation measures at FRCE.

Krelie cited FRCE’s membership as an Environmental Steward of the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality’s Environmental Stewardship Initiative (ESI) in playing a significant role when setting the depot’s environmental goals.

The ESI is designed to promote and encourage superior environmental performance in North Carolina’s regulated community. FRCE was one of the earliest organizations in the state to earn the title of Environmental Steward in 2004. The depot is the only Department of Defense facility serving as an ESI member.

“We're moving in sync with the overall goal of the Navy but we have gotten aggressive enough to increase the percentages and output of what we expect from the facility,” said Krelie. “Our goals are pretty aggressive but that is part of being an Environmental Steward. Setting aggressive goals is a requirement.”

In addition to FRCE’s ESI membership, the depot stays engaged with the community through a variety of community outreach activities focusing on environmental sustainment.

For Earth Day 2023, FRCE provided outreach at Childcare Development Centers on MCAS Cherry Point. Children were given an overview of why it is important to protect the environment each and every day and decorated recycling containers to be used throughout the FRCE facility.

The depot also provides environmental mentorship to United States Coast Guard Aviation Logistics Center Elizabeth City.

“The outreach efforts are rewarding because we see how other organizations are doing things,” said Stephen Azok, program coordinator for FRCE’s Environmental Management System (EMS). “We also show how we do things, often without using as much capital. Some of the organizations outside the gate reach out to us. They’re interested in what we do, especially how our workforce is involved.”

According to Azok, FRCE has many success stories to share. He said the depot’s UH-1N Huey production line exemplifies how FRCE’s workforce contributes to achieving the command’s environmental objectives.

In 2023, the UH-1N line swapped out diesel-powered generators for battery-powered units, making FRCE the first adapter of this technology within the Naval Aviation community. These self-contained battery systems replaced the diesel operated generators that are utilized as auxiliary power units for the Huey.

Utilizing these systems reduced harmful air emissions generated by the burning of fossil fuels and the transport equipment needed to move diesel-powered generators. Not only is the impact to the environment decreased and energy conservation increased, work areas are safer for team members in the area.

“Without the UH-1N team’s understanding of our environmental goals and their efforts to improve performance, we would not have won this award,” said Azok. “This initiative had positive impacts which went far beyond just improving their processes. It shows that our workforce is actively involved. They're looking at these challenges and finding the solutions.”

Azok credits FRCE’s leadership over the years for instilling the importance of environmental compliance at the depot. He said the depot’s emphasis on workplace safety stresses the importance of personnel looking after each other.

“Safety is a very important part of the culture here at FRC East,” said Azok. “Our environmental program integrates well with this because it’s also about protecting the workforce, especially the health of the people 10, 20 or 30 years down the road. What we are doing now protects the future health of our personnel as well as safeguarding the environment they live in.”

Azok said FRCE’s environmental efforts have garnered an impressive list of accolades that highlight the depot’s commitment to being good stewards of their environment.

In addition to receiving five SECNAV Environmental Awards, the depot has also received the Secretary of Defense Environmental Award, two Secretary of Defense honorable mentions, eight Chief of Naval Operations Environmental Awards and the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality’s P2 Award for pollution prevention, in addition to two Sustainability Awards from the state.

Despite these past successes, Krelie said the depot remains focused on current and future environmental objectives and mandates.

“Ultimately, we have an obligation to meet all of our environmental regulatory commitments,” said Krelie. “This goes beyond meeting regulations and complying with instructions. We have an obligation to our local community and to the warfighter. Meeting our environmental commitments ensures that we are protecting our community and providing our warfighters with capable and combat-ready aircraft. Everyone at FRC East takes this responsibility very seriously.”

FRCE is North Carolina's largest maintenance, repair, overhaul and technical services provider, with more than 4,000 civilian, military and contract workers. Its annual revenue exceeds $1 billion. The depot provides service to the fleet while functioning as an integral part of the greater U.S. Navy; Naval Air Systems Command; and Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers.

Learn more at www.navair.navy.mil/frce or https://www.facebook.com/FleetReadinessCenterEast.

Apr 18, 2024

Engineering the future: FRCE engineers help high schoolers compete in this year’s UUAV competition

With the help of Fleet Readiness Center East (FRCE) engineers, teams of Eastern North Carolina high school students geared up for the 2024 Ultimate Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UUAV) Competition April 13 in Newport.

FRCE’s STEM Outreach Team joined forces with Craven Community College and North Carolina State University to host the third UUAV Competition at the Crystal Coast Radio Control Club, where teams of high school students entered their unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) in hopes of winning.

According to FRCE Executive Director Mark Meno, the UUAV competition aids in the inspiration of the next generation of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) professionals. 

“Our goal for these events is to educate and inspire. Supporting events like this not only reinforces our commitment to STEM education, but also strengthens the depot’s commitment to the community,” said Meno. “By inspiring local students to explore STEM-based career paths, we’re not just shaping the next generation of engineers and aviation professionals; we’re fostering a more innovative future workforce for Eastern North Carolina.”

Teams of students representing seven high schools – Croatan, West Carteret, Gramercy Christian, Early College of Eastern Applied Science and Technology (EAST), Havelock, New Bern and Pamlico – participated in the competition. Fifteen engineers from FRCE volunteered to coach the seven teams throughout the process, said Carli Starnes, a mechanical engineer with the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) C-130 Long Term Readiness Structures Fleet Support Team (FST) at FRCE.

“The students have been preparing for the competition for quite some time,” said Starnes. “We held an informational workshop for the students and teachers in November of 2023 and officially kicked off the event in January. After the kickoff event, our engineers visited each high school once a week to guide the students through the process of building their UAV.”

The annual competition offers local high school students the opportunity to learn more about engineering and aerodynamics from a STEM professional, according to De Aundria Scott, a mechanical engineer on the Unmanned Aerial Systems FST who served as a mentor for the team representing Pamlico High School.

“This really gives the students a taste of what engineering looks like and the types of things they can do within engineering,” said Scott. “The teams learn quite a lot about teamwork while they go through the engineering design and building process, which includes brainstorming solutions, listing pros and cons, building, testing and, if needed, rebuilding.”

Many students emphasized how beneficial the competition has been for them, including Blake Randolph from Gramercy Christian School in Newport. 

“I want to go into aerospace engineering, and this was a great opportunity for me to start working on these kinds of things,” said Randolph. “This whole process has been very informational and offered us a good learning experience.”

Sophia Mendolia from Croatan High School said participating in this competition was not only fun, but will also help the students stand out in competitive educational settings.

“This event gives us a head start,” said Mendolia. “It gives us the opportunity to get our feet wet by starting to learn about engineering principles and building an aircraft. And we get to take what we have learned in our aerospace classes at school and apply it to the aircraft we just made. It’s a great way to get hands-on experience and learn more.”

Each team was graded based on four different categories: maneuverability, speed, safety checklist and overall presentation, as evaluated by a panel of leaders from FRCE and Craven Community College. Croatan High School took first place in the competition for the second year running, followed by Pamlico High School and New Bern High School. West Carteret High School’s team earned the title of “best in show” for creating the most visually striking UAV design and was presented with a plaque for this achievement.

According to Elton Fairless, Unmanned Aerial Systems FST team lead, each group of students was given a list of guidelines to help them throughout the process.

“We gave them a list of requirements for the project back in January,” said Fairless. “This project isn’t just about building a model aircraft or drone. We teach the students the engineering process by going through a list of requirements for their UAV and having them make a presentation that explains their thought processes, design features and concepts.”  

Though the students are given a list of requirements for their UAV project, Fairless said they are encouraged to use creativity and innovation in their design process.

“The UAVs are predominantly made of foam board, but the students are allowed to add other parts to their aircraft,” Fairless continued. “Many schools are using more 3D printed parts, whether it be structural reinforcements or aerodynamic enhancements. I am always very impressed with what they come up with.”

The FRCE FABLAB, a mobile makerspace used by the depot’s STEM Outreach Team to bring STEM concepts and equipment directly to students, was present at the event to assist the students with any adjustments or repairs.

“Each team is given a toolkit for their aircraft, but the toolkit only has so much,” said Scott. “Since the aircraft are made of lightweight and fragile materials, it’s common for them to need repairs between flights, especially as we are seeing them travel over 60 miles per hour today. The FABLAB offers the students a one-stop-shop for those repairs whether it’s last-minute 3-D printing or simply needing a different drill bit.”

STEM Outreach Team Lead Randall Lewis noted how mentorship is an important facet of the UUAV competition.

“This competition is great in terms of mentorship as it allows us to engage directly with the high school students,” said Lewis. “Our engineers work one-on-one with the students for many weeks, expanding their knowledge of aviation and engineering concepts and even career opportunities.

“This program really helps us on our education pipeline,” Lewis continued. “And hopefully it will get the kids excited to pursue the internship opportunities, Department of Defense Science, Mathematics and Research for Transformation Scholarships, or any of the other opportunities we offer at FRC East.”

The annual UUAV Competition is just one of the many outreach events supported by FRCE, all with the goal of giving students the tools they need for their future career, according to Abigail Digsby, a mechanical engineer with the depot’s STEM Outreach Team.

“Events and learning experiences like this are invaluable when you get into the workforce,” said Digsby. “A lot of what these students do in high school and college is lesson-based, but this sort of hands-on stuff is helpful for the students. It also helps spark new interests among the students, specifically in STEM. The depot needs as many smart, dedicated engineers.”

Additional support for the event was provided by the Eastern North Carolina Tech Bridge, the Office of Naval Research’s Naval STEM program, and NASA’s North Carolina Space Grant. The ENC Tech Bridge operates in conjunction with a partnership between FRCE and Craven County, and works to build an ecosystem of innovation to support the Navy and Marine Corps with a focus on several areas of consideration, including manufacturing and repair technologies; advanced manufacturing; big data, data analytics and visualization; technical insertion; augmented and mixed reality; automation and robotics; and soft and wicked problem solving.

FRCE is North Carolina's largest maintenance, repair, overhaul and technical services provider, with more than 4,000 civilian, military and contract workers. Its annual revenue exceeds $1 billion. The depot provides service to the fleet while functioning as an integral part of the greater U.S. Navy; NAVAIR; and Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers.

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