NAVAIR

Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG)

9 Images

Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) completes a first-of-its-kind recovery of an F/A-18E Super Hornet at the Runway Arrested Landing Site in Lakehurst, N.J., Oct. 13, 2016. (U.S. Navy Photo)
Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) completes a first-of-its-kind recovery of an F/A-18E Super Hornet at the Runway Arrested Landing Site in Lakehurst, N.J., Oct. 13, 2016. (U.S. Navy Photo)

<p>Computer-generated design of a complete one-wire Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) system schematic (U.S. Navy graphic)</p>

Computer-generated design of a complete one-wire Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) system schematic (U.S. Navy graphic)


<p>The Navy’s Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) test team successfully completes 100-knot arrestment of an F/A-18C/D representative dead-load at the Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst Jet Car Track Site (JCTS) April 2011. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

The Navy’s Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) test team successfully completes 100-knot arrestment of an F/A-18C/D representative dead-load at the Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst Jet Car Track Site (JCTS) April 2011. (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) advancing construction of the Jet Car Track Site (JCTS) Oct. 2, 2009 when the first cable drum support structure is installed at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Lakehurst, New Jersey. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) advancing construction of the Jet Car Track Site (JCTS) Oct. 2, 2009 when the first cable drum support structure is installed at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Lakehurst, New Jersey. (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>Testing of the Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) power conditioning system continues simultaneous to construction of the Jet Car Track Site (JCTS) as the starboard build-out of air lines to manifolds shown here, takes place Nov. 20, 2009, at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Lakehurst, New Jersey. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

Testing of the Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) power conditioning system continues simultaneous to construction of the Jet Car Track Site (JCTS) as the starboard build-out of air lines to manifolds shown here, takes place Nov. 20, 2009, at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Lakehurst, New Jersey. (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>The Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) Cable Shock Absorber (CSA) absorbs the initial kink wave of energy created when the arresting aircraft’s tailhook engages the cross deck pendant, or wire. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

The Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) Cable Shock Absorber (CSA) absorbs the initial kink wave of energy created when the arresting aircraft’s tailhook engages the cross deck pendant, or wire. (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>The Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment program’s Advanced Arresting Gear team accepts delivery Dec. 11, 2009, and installs the conical/cable drum assembly at the Jet Car Track Site (JCTS) being constructed at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Lakehurst, New Jersey. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

The Aircraft Launch and Recovery Equipment program’s Advanced Arresting Gear team accepts delivery Dec. 11, 2009, and installs the conical/cable drum assembly at the Jet Car Track Site (JCTS) being constructed at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in Lakehurst, New Jersey. (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>An aircraft representative weighted sled, or dead-load, catches the Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) cable at the Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst Jet Car Track Site (JCTS) in Lakehurst, New Jersey. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

An aircraft representative weighted sled, or dead-load, catches the Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) cable at the Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst Jet Car Track Site (JCTS) in Lakehurst, New Jersey. (U.S. Navy photo)


The Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) team guides an electric motor as it is lowered into the pit at the Runway Arrested Landing Site (RALS). The team has been working for months to prepare the site for commissioning and live aircraft arrestment testing slated for late 2015. (U.S. Navy photo)
The Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) team guides an electric motor as it is lowered into the pit at the Runway Arrested Landing Site (RALS). The team has been working for months to prepare the site for commissioning and live aircraft arrestment testing slated for late 2015. (U.S. Navy photo)