NAVAIR

H-53 Helicopters

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A pair of King Stallions conducted external load flight tests June 7 at Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation's Development Flight Center in West Palm Beach, Fla. Each CH-53K carried 12,000 lb. loads; one aircraft conducting flight expansion tests, the other a training flight in preparation for operational test with U.S. Marine Corps Operational Test Pilot Lt. Col. Foster Carlile at the controls. Flight expansion tests will continue on both aircraft with incrementally increasing speeds and then up to the CH-53K’s requirement, a 27,000-lb. external payload. The most powerful helicopter in the Department of Defense, the CH-53K is on track for an Operational Assessment (OA) in 2016 and a 2019 initial operational capability to deliver four aircraft, which includes combat ready crews, logistically prepared to deploy. (Photo courtesy Sikorsky)
A pair of King Stallions conducted external load flight tests June 7 at Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation's Development Flight Center in West Palm Beach, Fla. Each CH-53K carried 12,000 lb. loads; one aircraft conducting flight expansion tests, the other a training flight in preparation for operational test with U.S. Marine Corps Operational Test Pilot Lt. Col. Foster Carlile at the controls. Flight expansion tests will continue on both aircraft with incrementally increasing speeds and then up to the CH-53K’s requirement, a 27,000-lb. external payload. The most powerful helicopter in the Department of Defense, the CH-53K is on track for an Operational Assessment (OA) in 2016 and a 2019 initial operational capability to deliver four aircraft, which includes combat ready crews, logistically prepared to deploy. (Photo courtesy Sikorsky)

<p>A CH-53K King Stallion, the U.S. Marine Corps' newest helicopter, takes off Oct. 27, 2015 from Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation's Development Flight Center. The helicopter completed its first flight event hovering for 30 minutes at 25 feet while the test team assessed basic aircraft controllability and landing. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Sikorsky/Released)</p>

A CH-53K King Stallion, the U.S. Marine Corps' newest helicopter, takes off Oct. 27, 2015 from Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation's Development Flight Center. The helicopter completed its first flight event hovering for 30 minutes at 25 feet while the test team assessed basic aircraft controllability and landing. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Sikorsky/Released)


CH-53K completes first 20K lift: The U.S. Marine Corps' newest helicopter, the CH-53K, completed its first external load flight test carrying a 20,000 lb. load May 26, 2016 at Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation's Development Flight Center in West Palm Beach, Fla. Envelope expansion tests will continue with incrementally increasing speeds with the 20,000 load, and then on to the CH-53K’s requirement, a 27,000-lb. external payload. (Photo courtesy Sikorsky)
CH-53K completes first 20K lift: The U.S. Marine Corps' newest helicopter, the CH-53K, completed its first external load flight test carrying a 20,000 lb. load May 26, 2016 at Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation's Development Flight Center in West Palm Beach, Fla. Envelope expansion tests will continue with incrementally increasing speeds with the 20,000 load, and then on to the CH-53K’s requirement, a 27,000-lb. external payload. (Photo courtesy Sikorsky)

The most powerful helicopter in the Department of Defense, the CH-53K is a new-build helicopter that will expand the fleet’s ability to move more material, more rapidly throughout the area of responsibility using proven and mature technologies. Designed to lift nearly 14 tons at a mission radius of 110 nautical miles in Navy high/hot environments, the CH-53K is designed to lift triple the baseline CH-53E lift capability with an equivalent logistics shipboard footprint, lower operating costs per aircraft, and less direct maintenance man hours per flight hour. The USMC’s procurement objective is 200 helicopters. (Photo courtesy Sikorsky)
The most powerful helicopter in the Department of Defense, the CH-53K is a new-build helicopter that will expand the fleet’s ability to move more material, more rapidly throughout the area of responsibility using proven and mature technologies. Designed to lift nearly 14 tons at a mission radius of 110 nautical miles in Navy high/hot environments, the CH-53K is designed to lift triple the baseline CH-53E lift capability with an equivalent logistics shipboard footprint, lower operating costs per aircraft, and less direct maintenance man hours per flight hour. The USMC’s procurement objective is 200 helicopters. (Photo courtesy Sikorsky)

<p>A CH-53K King Stallion conducts its first hover with a 12,000 lb. load Apr. 19, 2016 at Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation's Development Flight Center in West Palm Beach, Fla. (Photo courtesy Sikorsky)</p>

A CH-53K King Stallion conducts its first hover with a 12,000 lb. load Apr. 19, 2016 at Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation's Development Flight Center in West Palm Beach, Fla. (Photo courtesy Sikorsky)


<p>Apr. 18, 2016 - Members of the Blue-Green Team pose for group photo in front of an MH-53E during a tour at Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadrons (HM) 14 in Norfolk, Va. The team met to tackle mission readiness issues related to H-53 helicopters shared between the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, such as maintenance processes, procedures, and training. From the left: Lt. Cmdr. Michael Lanzillo, HM-14 maintenance officer; Lt. Col. Enrique Azenon, Marine Aircraft Group (MAG) 29 Personal Support Detachment commanding officer; Capt. Melissa DePriest, Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron (MALS) 29 assistant aircraft maintenance officer; Maj. Paul Herrle, MALS-29 aircraft maintenance officer; Lt. Col. Brian Taylor, Naval Air Systems Command H-53 Heavy Lift Helicopter Program In-Service Integrated Product Team co-lead; Cmdr. Grady Duffey, wing maintenance officer Helicopter Sea Combat Wing Atlantic Fleet; Col. Sean Salene, MAG-29 commanding officer; Cmdr. Derek Brady, HM-14 commanding officer;

Apr. 18, 2016 - Members of the Blue-Green Team pose for group photo in front of an MH-53E during a tour at Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadrons (HM) 14 in Norfolk, Va. The team met to tackle mission readiness issues related to H-53 helicopters shared between the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, such as maintenance processes, procedures, and training. From the left: Lt. Cmdr. Michael Lanzillo, HM-14 maintenance officer; Lt. Col. Enrique Azenon, Marine Aircraft Group (MAG) 29 Personal Support Detachment commanding officer; Capt. Melissa DePriest, Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron (MALS) 29 assistant aircraft maintenance officer; Maj. Paul Herrle, MALS-29 aircraft maintenance officer; Lt. Col. Brian Taylor, Naval Air Systems Command H-53 Heavy Lift Helicopter Program In-Service Integrated Product Team co-lead; Cmdr. Grady Duffey, wing maintenance officer Helicopter Sea Combat Wing Atlantic Fleet; Col. Sean Salene, MAG-29 commanding officer; Cmdr. Derek Brady, HM-14 commanding officer;


A U.S. Marine MH-53E Sea Dragon conducts a dust-penetrating light detection and ranging (DUSPEN LIDAR) test flight at NAS Patuxent River, Md. on Oct. 5, 2012. The test demonstrates how the LIDAR system inputs data to show images of flight hazards such as wires, berms, slants and uneven or rough ground which would make landing safely more difficult if unseen. Normally, these hazards would not be clear when using typical sensors during a dusty landing. (U.S. Navy photo by Liz Wolter)
A U.S. Marine MH-53E Sea Dragon conducts a dust-penetrating light detection and ranging (DUSPEN LIDAR) test flight at NAS Patuxent River, Md. on Oct. 5, 2012. The test demonstrates how the LIDAR system inputs data to show images of flight hazards such as wires, berms, slants and uneven or rough ground which would make landing safely more difficult if unseen. Normally, these hazards would not be clear when using typical sensors during a dusty landing. (U.S. Navy photo by Liz Wolter)

A CH-53E conducts safe separation aerial tests over the Chesapeake Bay near NAS Patuxent River, Md. on Dec. 22, 2011. (U.S. Navy photo by Liz Wolter)
A CH-53E conducts safe separation aerial tests over the Chesapeake Bay near NAS Patuxent River, Md. on Dec. 22, 2011. (U.S. Navy photo by Liz Wolter)

CH-53D in Afghanistan Nov. 2009
CH-53D in Afghanistan Nov. 2009

U.S. Marines with 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 3, 2nd Marine Expeditionary Brigade, along with approximately 650 Afghan soldiers and police officers from the Afghan National Security Force (ANSF), prepare to board CH-53D Sea Stallion and CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters at Forward Operating Base Dwyer, Afghanistan, July 2, 2009. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Chief Warrant Officer 3 Philippe E. Chasse) Below: U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Jeffrey Haertling, with 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, checks a field for hidden weapons during an operation in the Helmand Province of Afghanistan, July 5, 2009. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Pete Thibodeau)
U.S. Marines with 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 3, 2nd Marine Expeditionary Brigade, along with approximately 650 Afghan soldiers and police officers from the Afghan National Security Force (ANSF), prepare to board CH-53D Sea Stallion and CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters at Forward Operating Base Dwyer, Afghanistan, July 2, 2009. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Chief Warrant Officer 3 Philippe E. Chasse) Below: U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Jeffrey Haertling, with 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, checks a field for hidden weapons during an operation in the Helmand Province of Afghanistan, July 5, 2009. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Pete Thibodeau)

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	Island of Sumatra, Indonesia (Jan. 24, 2005) - An MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopter, assigned to the "Blackhawks" of Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron Fifteen (HM-15), delivers food and relief supplies to a village on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia. HM-15 is currently embarked aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2). Essex is currently underway in support of Operation Unified Assistance, the humanitarian operation effort in the wake of the Tsunami that struck South East Asia. Essex is the Navy's only forward deployed amphibious assault ship homeported in Sasebo, Japan. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Bart A. Bauer (RELEASED)<br />
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Island of Sumatra, Indonesia (Jan. 24, 2005) - An MH-53E Sea Dragon helicopter, assigned to the "Blackhawks" of Helicopter Mine Countermeasures Squadron Fifteen (HM-15), delivers food and relief supplies to a village on the island of Sumatra, Indonesia. HM-15 is currently embarked aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Essex (LHD 2). Essex is currently underway in support of Operation Unified Assistance, the humanitarian operation effort in the wake of the Tsunami that struck South East Asia. Essex is the Navy's only forward deployed amphibious assault ship homeported in Sasebo, Japan. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Bart A. Bauer (RELEASED)

 


A CH-53D from MCAF Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii prepares to take off from Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (HX) 21 at NAS Patuxent River, Md. on November 12, 2008. (U.S. Navy photo by Liz Wolter)
A CH-53D from MCAF Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii prepares to take off from Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (HX) 21 at NAS Patuxent River, Md. on November 12, 2008. (U.S. Navy photo by Liz Wolter)

CH-53E coming aboard the USS San Antonio while undergoing aircraft dynamic interface testing off the coast of Virginia and Maryland as part of the post delivery test and trials period.
CH-53E coming aboard the USS San Antonio while undergoing aircraft dynamic interface testing off the coast of Virginia and Maryland as part of the post delivery test and trials period.

CH-53K King Stallion
CH-53K King Stallion