NAVAIR

Precision Strike Weapons

29 Images

Ordnanceman from Marine Attack Squadron (VMA) 223 load a Laser Joint Direct Attack Weapon to an AV-8B Harrier. (U.S. Navy photo)
Ordnanceman from Marine Attack Squadron (VMA) 223 load a Laser Joint Direct Attack Weapon to an AV-8B Harrier. (U.S. Navy photo)

Night flight during developmental testing of the new Low-FOD drogue at Naval Air Station Patuxent River. The new drogue will improve readiness, availability and significantly reduce the fleet burden of spending high-maintenance man-hours required to repair legacy drogues. (U.S. Navy photo)
Night flight during developmental testing of the new Low-FOD drogue at Naval Air Station Patuxent River. The new drogue will improve readiness, availability and significantly reduce the fleet burden of spending high-maintenance man-hours required to repair legacy drogues. (U.S. Navy photo)

Aviation Ordnancemen assigned to the aircraft carrier USS George HW Bush (CVN 77) lift a LRASM shape from its container and onto the skid in preparation for move to the flight deck during the weapon’s carrier suitability assessment. (U.S. Navy photo)
Aviation Ordnancemen assigned to the aircraft carrier USS George HW Bush (CVN 77) lift a LRASM shape from its container and onto the skid in preparation for move to the flight deck during the weapon’s carrier suitability assessment. (U.S. Navy photo)

An F/A-18 carries the new Harpoon Block II+ missile during a free flight test Nov. 18 at Point Mugu's Sea Range in California. The Navy plans to deliver the Block II+ variant to the fleet in 2017. (U.S. Navy photo)
An F/A-18 carries the new Harpoon Block II+ missile during a free flight test Nov. 18 at Point Mugu's Sea Range in California. The Navy plans to deliver the Block II+ variant to the fleet in 2017. (U.S. Navy photo)

An F/A-18 carries the new Harpoon Block II+ missile during a free flight test Nov. 18 at Point Mugu's Sea Range in California. The Navy plans to deliver the Block II+ variant to the fleet in 2017. (U.S. Navy photo)
An F/A-18 carries the new Harpoon Block II+ missile during a free flight test Nov. 18 at Point Mugu's Sea Range in California. The Navy plans to deliver the Block II+ variant to the fleet in 2017. (U.S. Navy photo)

<p>An AV-8B carries a load of six GBU-32 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) on the new Digital Improved Triple Ejector Rack. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

An AV-8B carries a load of six GBU-32 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) on the new Digital Improved Triple Ejector Rack. (U.S. Navy photo)


An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant carries two internal AGM-154 Joint Stand-Off Weapons (JSOW) for the first time during a weapons environment test Aug. 27 at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md. (Photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin)
An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant carries two internal AGM-154 Joint Stand-Off Weapons (JSOW) for the first time during a weapons environment test Aug. 27 at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md. (Photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin)

<p>Two F/A-18 Super Hornets assigned to Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 31 successfully complete the last JSOW C-1 free-flight test at the Sea Test Range, Point Mugu, Calif. in January 2015. Initial operational capability of JSOW C-1 is on schedule for 2016. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

Two F/A-18 Super Hornets assigned to Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 31 successfully complete the last JSOW C-1 free-flight test at the Sea Test Range, Point Mugu, Calif. in January 2015. Initial operational capability of JSOW C-1 is on schedule for 2016. (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>An F/A-18 Hornet from Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 192 loaded with a Joint Standoff Weapon. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

An F/A-18 Hornet from Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 192 loaded with a Joint Standoff Weapon. (U.S. Navy photo)


The U.S. Navy completes the first free-flight testing of the Joint Standoff Weapon C-1 variant at Point Mugu Sea Range Calif. in July 2011. Free-flight tests are done to verify that the weapon's characteristics meet the performance requirements in the design. The event was the first end-to-end functionality test of an inert JSOW C-1, from pre-flight to target impact. (U.S. Navy photo)
The U.S. Navy completes the first free-flight testing of the Joint Standoff Weapon C-1 variant at Point Mugu Sea Range Calif. in July 2011. Free-flight tests are done to verify that the weapon's characteristics meet the performance requirements in the design. The event was the first end-to-end functionality test of an inert JSOW C-1, from pre-flight to target impact. (U.S. Navy photo)

<p>A Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) launches from an Air Force B-1B Lancer during flight testing in August 2013. DARPA designed the free-flight transition test (FFTT) demonstration to verify the prototype's flight characteristics and assess subsystem and sensor performance. Designed to launch from both ships and planes such as the B-1 bomber, the test vehicle detected, engaged and hit an unmanned 260-foot Mobile Ship Target (MST) with an inert warhead.(DARPA photo)</p>

A Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) launches from an Air Force B-1B Lancer during flight testing in August 2013. DARPA designed the free-flight transition test (FFTT) demonstration to verify the prototype's flight characteristics and assess subsystem and sensor performance. Designed to launch from both ships and planes such as the B-1 bomber, the test vehicle detected, engaged and hit an unmanned 260-foot Mobile Ship Target (MST) with an inert warhead.(DARPA photo)


<p>U.S. Air Force tech. sgt. load standardization crew member maneuvers a Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) in preparation for an upcoming test flight in February 2015 at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The Navy, Air Force and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) completed the test Feb. 4, successfully launching the LRASM from an Air Force B-1 Bomber. (U.S. Air Force photo)</p>

U.S. Air Force tech. sgt. load standardization crew member maneuvers a Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) in preparation for an upcoming test flight in February 2015 at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas. The Navy, Air Force and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) completed the test Feb. 4, successfully launching the LRASM from an Air Force B-1 Bomber. (U.S. Air Force photo)


<p>An Air Force B-1B Lancer drops a Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) during a2013 flight test from Dyess Air Force Base in Texas to Point Mugu Sea Test Range off the coast of southern California.  Once in position, the B-1 released the LRASM, which followed a pre-planned route towards the target. Approximately halfway to its destination, the weapon switched to autonomous guidance, in which it autonomously detected the moving MST and guided itself to hit the desired location on the target.(DARPA photo)</p>

An Air Force B-1B Lancer drops a Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM) during a2013 flight test from Dyess Air Force Base in Texas to Point Mugu Sea Test Range off the coast of southern California.  Once in position, the B-1 released the LRASM, which followed a pre-planned route towards the target. Approximately halfway to its destination, the weapon switched to autonomous guidance, in which it autonomously detected the moving MST and guided itself to hit the desired location on the target.(DARPA photo)


<p>Marine Corps Aviation Ordnanceman checks the bomb bay of an F-35 assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 fitted with four Small Diameter Bomb II (GBU-53/B). SDB II is a 250-pound class, air-to-ground weapon that provides adverse weather, day or night standoff capability against mobile, moving and fixed-targets using a multi-mode seeker, real-time target classification algorithms, and a data-link. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

Marine Corps Aviation Ordnanceman checks the bomb bay of an F-35 assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron (VMFAT) 501 fitted with four Small Diameter Bomb II (GBU-53/B). SDB II is a 250-pound class, air-to-ground weapon that provides adverse weather, day or night standoff capability against mobile, moving and fixed-targets using a multi-mode seeker, real-time target classification algorithms, and a data-link. (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>Aviation ordnanceman builds MK-76 training bombs on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

Aviation ordnanceman builds MK-76 training bombs on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>An aviator from Marine All-Weather Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA(AW)) 533 conducts a preflight inspection of precision guided ordnance on an F/A-18E Super Hornet. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

An aviator from Marine All-Weather Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA(AW)) 533 conducts a preflight inspection of precision guided ordnance on an F/A-18E Super Hornet. (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Stethem (DDG 63) fires a Harpoon missile during a sinking exercise as part of Valiant Shield 2014. Air and sea units from the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force participated in the sinking exercise of the ex-USS Fresno to gain proficiency in tactics, targeting and live-firing against a surface target at sea. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Stethem (DDG 63) fires a Harpoon missile during a sinking exercise as part of Valiant Shield 2014. Air and sea units from the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force participated in the sinking exercise of the ex-USS Fresno to gain proficiency in tactics, targeting and live-firing against a surface target at sea. (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>An F/A-18 Super Hornet assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 complete the first captive carry of four Harpoon 1C weapons in May 2013.(U.S. Navy photo)</p>

An F/A-18 Super Hornet assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23 complete the first captive carry of four Harpoon 1C weapons in May 2013.(U.S. Navy photo)


<p>A P-8A Poseidon assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 20 completed the first dynamic stores release testing of four Harpoon shapes in January 2013. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

A P-8A Poseidon assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 20 completed the first dynamic stores release testing of four Harpoon shapes in January 2013. (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>A squadron troubleshooter leans on the drop tanks of an aerial refueling-configured F/A-18F Super Hornet while waiting for the commencement of the next event during cyclic flight operations on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76).</p>

A squadron troubleshooter leans on the drop tanks of an aerial refueling-configured F/A-18F Super Hornet while waiting for the commencement of the next event during cyclic flight operations on the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76).


<p>Aviation Structural Mechanic 3rd Class Johan Sanchez of Carson, Calif., assigned to the Black Aces of Strike Fighter Squadron Four One (VFA-41), checks the hydraulic lines and blades of an aerial refueling system (ARS) aboard the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The ARS is a combination external fuel tank and hose reel used for aerial refueling operations. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

Aviation Structural Mechanic 3rd Class Johan Sanchez of Carson, Calif., assigned to the Black Aces of Strike Fighter Squadron Four One (VFA-41), checks the hydraulic lines and blades of an aerial refueling system (ARS) aboard the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The ARS is a combination external fuel tank and hose reel used for aerial refueling operations. (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>Two aviation ordancemen assigned to Flighting Redcocks of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 22 carry a bomb rack onto the flight deck of USS Ronald Reagon (CVN 76). (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

Two aviation ordancemen assigned to Flighting Redcocks of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 22 carry a bomb rack onto the flight deck of USS Ronald Reagon (CVN 76). (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>An F/A-18 assigned to the Dust Devils of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 31 carries a load of ten GBU-32 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) over the test range at Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, Calif. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

An F/A-18 assigned to the Dust Devils of Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 31 carries a load of ten GBU-32 Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) over the test range at Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, Calif. (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>An F/A-18 Hornet from Marine All-Weather Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA(AW)) 122 flies equipped with combat carriage of the GBU-32 Laser Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) mounted under its port (left) wing. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

An F/A-18 Hornet from Marine All-Weather Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA(AW)) 122 flies equipped with combat carriage of the GBU-32 Laser Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM) mounted under its port (left) wing. (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>Flight crew inspects a Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM). (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

Flight crew inspects a Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM). (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>An F-35B test drops an inert 1,000-pound GBU-32 Joint Direct Attack Munition over an Atlantic test range from an internal weapons bay in 2012.(U.S. Navy photo)</p>

An F-35B test drops an inert 1,000-pound GBU-32 Joint Direct Attack Munition over an Atlantic test range from an internal weapons bay in 2012.(U.S. Navy photo)


<p>Composite photo of Next Generation Ejection Seat sled test demonstrating controllable propulsion provided by Cartridge Actuated Devices and Propellant Actuated Devices, or CAD/PADs. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

Composite photo of Next Generation Ejection Seat sled test demonstrating controllable propulsion provided by Cartridge Actuated Devices and Propellant Actuated Devices, or CAD/PADs. (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>A test dummy releases a Cartridge and Propellant Actuated Device. CADS/PADs are commodity items that function as a system component. In operation, they release precise explosive or propellant energy to perform controlled work functions in a variety of applications, including aircrew escape, fire suppression, and stores/emergency release systems. (U.S. Navy photo)</p>

A test dummy releases a Cartridge and Propellant Actuated Device. CADS/PADs are commodity items that function as a system component. In operation, they release precise explosive or propellant energy to perform controlled work functions in a variety of applications, including aircrew escape, fire suppression, and stores/emergency release systems. (U.S. Navy photo)


<p>In the skies over Afghanistan (Oct. 31, 2001) Two 500 pound Laser Guided Bomb Units (GBU-12) (left) and an AIM-9 "Sidewinder" short-range air-to-air missile are visible on the wing of an F/A-18 "Hornet" from the "Mighty Shrikes" of Strike Fighter Squadron Nine Four (VFA-94). VFA-94 is assigned to Carrier Airwing Eleven (CVW 11) aboard USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) and conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo)<br />
 </p>

In the skies over Afghanistan (Oct. 31, 2001) Two 500 pound Laser Guided Bomb Units (GBU-12) (left) and an AIM-9 "Sidewinder" short-range air-to-air missile are visible on the wing of an F/A-18 "Hornet" from the "Mighty Shrikes" of Strike Fighter Squadron Nine Four (VFA-94). VFA-94 is assigned to Carrier Airwing Eleven (CVW 11) aboard USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) and conducting missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. (U.S. Navy photo)