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Sustainment Vision 2020 Provides Enterprise Solutions to Readiness Recovery, AMPS 2018

From left, Debbie Vergos, Rob Willis, Capt. Mike York and Keith Johnson talk about how critical issues are being addressed to ensure the success of Sustainment Vision 2020 (SV2020) during the Aviation Maintenance Professional Symposium, held May 15-17 in Virginia Beach, Virginia. SV2020 aims to align various readiness recovery efforts with new solutions to bring sustainment operations into the 21st century, enabling Naval Aviation to recover and maintain effective and efficient flight-line readiness. (U.S. Navy photo/released)

From left, Debbie Vergos, Rob Willis, Capt. Mike York and Keith Johnson talk about how critical issues are being addressed to ensure the success of Sustainment Vision 2020 (SV2020) during the Aviation Maintenance Professional Symposium, held May 15-17 in Virginia Beach, Virginia. SV2020 aims to align various readiness recovery efforts with new solutions to bring sustainment operations into the 21st century, enabling Naval Aviation to recover and maintain effective and efficient flight-line readiness. (U.S. Navy photo/released)

Jun 13, 2018

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NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND, PATUXENT RIVER, Md. – Readiness recovery stood out as the primary focus of the 2018 Aerospace Maintenance Professionals Symposium, where several hundred aerospace maintenance professionals, civilians and industry representatives met in Virginia Beach, May 14-17 to collaborate and discuss critical issues concerning Naval Aviation maintenance.

Over the course of three days, two sessions were dedicated to Naval Aviation Enterprise (NAE) Sustainment Vision 2020 (SV2020). SV2020 aims to align various readiness recovery efforts with new solutions to bring sustainment operations into the 21st century, enabling Naval Aviation to recover and maintain effective and efficient flight-line readiness.

In recent years, the focus on readiness has increased due to the high operational tempo of the past few decades that increased wear and tear on aircraft. Additionally, budget constraints and unpredictable resources forced tradeoffs in critical areas of readiness, particularly sustainment.

“SV2020 takes on readiness recovery through a holistic, enterprise-level approach” said Rich Bomhold, director of SV2020. “We can no longer just pursue quick fixes to address readiness shortfalls. These provide brief spikes in improvement but long-term benefits are not born out,” he added.  “The time has come to address the root causes of readiness degradation and make fundamental changes to our sustainment system.”

SV2020 began in 2014 as a 10-year COMFRC strategy to modernize and right-size Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul operations within the Fleet Readiness Centers. In 2016, NAE leadership endorsed an expansion of that plan to modernize the entire NAE’s sustainment system in order to improve flight-line readiness more consistently and reliably in the long-term.

To develop SV2020, a rigorous study was done to identify the root causes of readiness degradation and the main challenges inhibiting Naval Aviation’s sustainment system. Then cause-effect logic was applied to map the route to the desired end state, which Bomhold described as “a modern, integrated, predictive and data-driven, globally-managed sustainment environment.”

A major focus of SV2020 is transforming IT infrastructure to provide real-time, actionable information enabling smarter, data-driven decision-making that can improve efficiency and outcomes.  

Another significant advancement will come from innovative new tools. SV2020 Capability and Capacity Team lead, Deborah Vergos explained that “in addition to having global visibility, for the first time we’ll be able to conduct “what-if analysis” of workload to optimize repair solutions.”

To ensure sustainment optimization is approached from an enterprise level, SV2020 establishes a Naval Aviation Sustainment Center (NASC) to provide long-term strategic guidance and work to preemptively address emerging constraints.

SV2020 also focuses on manpower and workforce proficiency, as these are important aspects to recovering and generating readiness. The SV2020 Workforce Proficiency Team lead, Keith Johnson, gave an overview of the efforts underway to not only improve the proficiency of the workforce but to ensure the workforce is used in the most efficient manner. Johnson noted that improving workforce proficiency will require the help of the aerospace maintenance professionals community.

Bomhold also called on the community to “help us identify the best and most relevant solutions.” He specifically appealed for engagement of younger generations, noting “the solutions they would put in place are probably different from what we would,” citing the use of YouTube when seeking information about completing a home repair as an example.

By taking a long-term, holistic approach to readiness and sustainment, SV2020 aims to create a smarter and faster dynamic maintenance environment that will increase throughput, improve aircraft availability for training and operational demand, and support the cutting-edge technologies needed by the warfighter in a complex, volatile and high-tech environment.

While providing an update on the state of Marine Corps aviation, Col. Dan Robinson acknowledged that “readiness is a very complex formula…we have to attack these problems holistically.”

Rear Adm. Mike Zarkowski, Commander, COMFRC, underscored the critical need to update Naval Aviation’s sustainment system to meet current and future demand saying, “SV2020 isn’t negotiable…the bottom line is we must get our sustainment system into the modern day. We need this to win the next war.”

 

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