NAVAIR

Navy Lakehurst employee named top Navy engineer for 2010

Michael Doyle, the lead Electro-Magnetics technologist at NAVAIR Lakehurst, N.J., is one of the Navy's "2010 Top Scientists and Engineers of the Year." (U.S. Navy photo)

Michael Doyle, the lead Electro-Magnetics technologist at NAVAIR Lakehurst, N.J., is one of the Navy's "2010 Top Scientists and Engineers of the Year." (U.S. Navy photo)

Jul 19, 2011

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Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition Sean Stackley, left, presents the 2010 Top Scientists and Engineers of the Year Award to NAVAIR Lakehurst engineer Michael Doyle in a ceremony held at the Pentagon July 15. (U.S. Navy photo)

Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition Sean Stackley, left, presents the 2010 Top Scientists and Engineers of the Y ...

LAKEHURST, N.J. — Michael Doyle, the lead Electro-Magnetics technologist for the Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) program at Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) in Lakehurst, N.J., has been chosen as one of the “2010 Top Scientists and Engineers of the Year” for the U.S. Navy.

In a ceremony held at the Pentagon July 15, Doyle was singled out for his role as the Navy’s leading expert in high energy, high power electromagnetic systems as they relate to launching and recovering aircraft. In 2010, his efforts were integral in the Navy’s first historic launch of an aircraft utilizing the EMALS system at Lakehurst.

According to Sean Stackley, Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition, in presenting the award he stated, “your technical excellence is outstanding and the payoff of your achievements to the Department of the Navy is significant.”

The EMALS system, along with the Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) program, which have both been in research, development, production and now testing at Lakehurst, are the critical technologies leading a new era of naval aviation that will enable aircraft to more safely and efficiently launch and recover aboard ships at sea.

The Navy’s current steam catapults and hydraulic arresting gear engines reflect the technology of the 1950’s. Largely through the vision and technical leadership of Doyle, the Navy is addressing a major need for high powered electromagnetic technologies to support the next generation of aircraft carrier – the Gerald R. Ford class, which will deploy in 2015.

Doyle is often called upon to provide his opinion on these concepts, to discuss the risks associated with them and to postulate on their operational value. According to his supervisor, Robert Rossi, “in many instances, Mike’s opinion has become the U.S. Navy’s opinion. He is the go-to expert, whose nuanced insight and inspired innovation is a leading force driving the vision of electromagnetic technology in support of naval aviation.”

Additionally, Doyle has contributed his technical guidance to the AAG program by helping define limitations and suggesting system configurations that will enhance the development of the program. He has also authored several technical papers on the application of linear motor technology as it applies to aircraft launch and recovery. He was recently the keynote speaker at the International Electric Machine and Drives Conference sponsored by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Also this year, he assisted NASA with their single stage to orbit launch assist program. And as an international expert in his field, Doyle was asked to support the United Kingdom’s electromagnetic catapult test program.

Throughout Doyle’s career with NAVAIR, which began in 1988 at Lakehurst, he has demonstrated commitment to the Navy’s mission. As a result of his knowledge and leadership, the Navy is preparing to institute ground-breaking technology in the form of electromagnetic launch and recovery of aircraft from ships at sea, a technology that will carry the Navy through the 21st century.

“I am extremely honored in being selected to receive this award," Doyle said. "I am truly accepting it as a representative of the entire EMALS team that has worked so hard for so many years to bring the concept of electromagnetic to a reality for the Navy. They are an incredibly talented group of people, and I am humbled to be a part of their success.”

Doyle, a native of Morestown, N.J., and current resident of Medford, N.J., is a graduate of Drexel University.

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4 Comments, Please review our Feedback Guidelines.


Anonymous said

So proud of Mike and his accomplishments. Along with his expertise, his integrity and his values make him the quality person every good man strives to be in this great country of ours.


October 31, 2011 at 3:46:49 PM EDT

Jim & Rosemary O'Donnell said

Wecan thank Mike's Mom, Carol and his deceased Dad, Gene for his outstanding accomplishments in his work defending this great country of ours. God bless America and God bless Mike and his family. My wife and I just celerebrated our 50th wedding anniversy that Mike attended. Mike never said a word about his citations. We're so lucky to have Mike on our side with his non-assuming attitude and his spirit of team-work for the Navy and the Marines. Uncle Jim and Aunt Rosie


July 25, 2011 at 7:22:56 PM EDT

Anonymous said

Congratulations to Mike Doyle. This award, although very prestigious, is truly deserved. Mike blends incredible technical expertise with team-working skills to get the best out of all his government and contractor teammates and keep the EMALS program going.


July 24, 2011 at 10:31:51 PM EDT

Anonymous said

Great accomplishement by Dr. Doyle. But on top of all of this, he is a really great guy and an excellent team member to work with.

Congrats!!!


July 22, 2011 at 2:22:45 PM EDT


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